End Domestic Abuse WI has a long history of supporting underserved and under-represented communities – including communities of color, those in later life, the LQBTQI+ community, people with disabilities, children and youth, immigrants and refugees, and tribal communities – in determining best practices for their own spaces, ensuring the safety of all affected by domestic violence, and improving perpetrator accountability.

We work to improve the responsiveness of service providers, health and legal systems, the faith community, and advocacy organizations to community-specific needs.

Our activities with or on behalf of these groups are determined by and led by those who are currently experiencing or who have formerly experienced domestic violence and their respective communities. We focus primarily on survivor-led efforts which involve grassroots and community-based groups.

WE LEAD The Leadership Institute: Advocates of Color Conference The Leadership Circle LGBTQ Committee LGBTQ Training LGBTQ Webinar Series Refugee Family Strengthening Programs (RFSP's) Working with Tribal Programs WI's Violence Against Women with Disabilities and Deaf Women Project Selected Resources

WE LEAD

WE LEAD is a year-long leadership academy which focuses on building new voices of leadership within the movement to end gender-based violence by providing hands-on leadership development opportunities for survivors of violence and/or people from Wisconsin’s underserved or under-represented communities.

Contact Danny Ho dannyh@endabusewi.org or Olivia Osborne (oliviao@endabusewi.org) with questions.

Applications for the current WE LEAD cohort have closed.

The Leadership Institute: Advocates of Color Conference

The Leadership Institute is an annual conference by and for advocates and activists of color in Wisconsin. It is a safe space for folks that identify as people of color who work, volunteer, or intern in domestic violence, sexual assault, or similar fields of gender-based violence work. This conference is intended to be a safe space specifically for people of color both adult and .

Contact Danny Ho dannyh@endabusewi.org for more information.

The Leadership Circle

The Leadership Circle is a group comprised of members from the under-served populations of WI who have shown experience and dedication to the healing of victims of domestic and sexual abuse. Facilitated by the REACH Coordinators of End Abuse, the group meets quarterly at various locations within Wisconsin to share their experiences, concerns, and latest initiatives in partnership with each other and End Abuse’s programming and staff. In addition, the Leadership Circle is encouraged to develop their own projects as a group that will complement their mission: “To identify societal issues and disparities that support oppression and to provide ideas to restore all affected by domestic violence.”

LGBTQ Committee

The LGBTQ Committee is a statewide committee comprised of individuals who self-identify as LGBTQ and allies that work directly with LGBTQ victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and hook up violence. Their mission to raise awareness through prevention and education, giving voice to people who are marginalized based on gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation whose lives have been affected by all violence, including sexual, domestic, and intimate partner.

For more information go to LGBTQ Committee Overview or contact Cody Warner codyw@endabusewi.org or Angie Rehling angier@wcasa.org

LGBTQ Training

***The LGBTQ training is being updated for a virtual setting more information coming soon!***

The LGBTQ Committee provides free, 8-hour trainings for member programs of End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Member programs may also invite their collaborating partners to have the training more multidisciplinary focused. This training is meant to provide a basic understanding of the LGBTQ community and how intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and hook up violence affect this community. Then the training moves into practical applications and next steps to support LGBTQ victims and survivors that you serve.

The LGBTQ training’s typical layout is:

  • Visualization exercise
  • LGBTQ movement historical perspective
  • Breakdown of LGBTQ and sex, gender, & attraction
  • Intimate Partner Violence & Sexual Assault in this community
  • Reflective exercises to start thinking about safety and stigma in this community
  • Work-related scenarios
  • Community readiness/Pride survey data
  • Action planning

To learn more about the LGBTQ training go HERE

***The LGBTQ training is being updated for a virtual setting more information coming soon!***

To request a training go HERE.

LGBTQ Webinar Series

The series is provided by End Abuse and Diverse and Resilient to support the grant requirements of the Department of Children and Families (DCF) Domestic Abuse ProgramThe series offers a wonderful opportunity to reflect on organization practices and culture, and to build bridges between existing knowledge and skills and innovative, emerging practices, while also meeting the DCF training requirement. 

Certificate of completion and additional resources: 

When you have completed the recorded webinar, download the certificate listed with each webinar, which can be completed electronically or by hand and printed. Any available transcripts and additional handouts are also available for download. 

A note to DV programs about DCF grant requirements and the LGBTQ webinar series:  

New staff should watch the core webinar on LGBTQ information and accessibility during their initial training period. New staff do not need to watch all webinars in the series during the initial training period to meet the grant requirements. This requirement only needs to be completed once and meets the obligation of new staff for the contract period. The core webinar is: 

  • Understanding and Affirming LGBTQ Survivors: Inclusive Advocacy for Domestic Violence Program Staff (released 6/21/2022) 

DCF domestic abuse contracts, from 2022 and earlier, state that initial training should be provided to all paid staff and direct service volunteers.  One of the required initial trainings should be “The series of three core webinars on LGBTQ information and accessibility (archived on website of End Domestic Abuse WI).”  Beginning in 2022, the series of three is now one core webinar described above. 

Each contract period, all  staff must complete additional training on providing welcoming, inclusive, and accessible services to survivors in the LGBTQ community. DCF partners with End Abuse each year to create a new webinar-based training that meets this requirement. Staff may watch the year’s new webinar or view one of the archived webinars as a “refresher” (or for the first time if they haven’t seen it).  Programs may also offer their own training for staff that addresses the topic of “providing welcoming, inclusive, and accessible services to survivors in the LGBTQ community” to meet the annual requirement. Contact your contract administrator if you have questions about another training meeting grant requirements. 

Refugee Family Strengthening Programs (RFSP's)

Between 2009 and 2011, we created outreach specifically to support Hmong and Southeast Asian Refugee Family Strengthening programs using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Located throughout WI, RFSP’s address specific needs of refugee communities and help refugees maintain self-sufficiency by addressing family violence through prevention, education, and intervention. This list includes RFSPs for Hmong, Cambodian, and Russian refugees.

Working with Tribal Programs

Since 2000, working closely with tribal programs around the state in addition to enjoying a close relationship with the statewide tribal coalition, American Indians Against Abuse. Below, find webinar recordings relating to this work.

A note about the Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy Series

These webinars comprise the series Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy, presented together by American Indians Against Abuse, End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin, WCASA, and the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families. This series of five Zoom Webinars shared the often unrecognized and unique dynamics of the eleven tribal areas in Wisconsin that address the issues of family violence, sexual assault, missing and murdered indigenous women, human trafficking, and domestic abuse.  With a focus on awareness and sharing, each webinar brought together knowledge and techniques to complement the tribal and nontribal programs that respond to violence.  Our partner-based initiative examined legal, historical, and cultural differences to promote understanding, community-based partnerships, and shared growth with the purpose of keeping victims, survivors and their families safe while encouraging all of our communities to thrive.

During this project we lost our dear friend and colleague, C.J. Doxtater. This series is dedicated to C.J., who put his heart into building bridges, bringing people together to do the work for survivors and communities.

COMING SOON - Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy Series: Episodes 1-3

Sharing Our Work, Sharing Our World – Webinar 1

This webinar begins the series Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy, presented together by American Indians Against Abuse, End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin, WCASA, and the WI Department of Children and Families. This series of five webinars share the often unrecognized and unique dynamics of the eleven tribal areas in Wisconsin that address the issues of family violence, sexual assault, missing and murdered indigenous women, human trafficking, and domestic abuse.

With a focus on awareness and sharing, each webinar brings together knowledge and techniques to complement the tribal and nontribal programs that respond to violence.  Our partner-based initiative will examine legal, historical, and cultural differences to promote understanding, community-based partnerships, and shared growth with the purpose of keeping victims, survivors, and their families safe while encouraging all of our communities to thrive.

Historical Trauma: The Effects of Unresolved Grief in Native Wisconsin – Webinar 2

This webinar provides a revealing examination of cultural trauma responses of Native Americans in Wisconsin. It offers a multi-tribal and personal overview, including tragedy and resilience, with guest presenters appearing alongside CJ Doxtater, End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin’s former Aging and Outreach Director.

Cultural Communications – Webinar 3

We cannot proceed without noting the loss of CJ Doxtater. Some of us have known him for many years and some of us met him only recently and more briefly.  For anyone who did not know of CJ’s passing, we share the sad news and his beautiful obituary: Cleveland “CJ” Doxtater, 71, Allouez, began his spirit walk after Covid 19 on Wednesday November 4, 2020Read more at this link. We found that Eagle Poem by Joy Harjo speaks to our memory of CJ. CJ’s spirit was at the heart of Bridging Tribal and Nontribal Advocacy, and a dedication of this series to him is part of our experience together in this webinar.

This webinar examines the difficulties in understanding and communicating from varied cultural standpoints. Issues that may confuse or interfere with the healing intent of domestic abuse, sexual assault and shelter programs will be considered. We include a question and answer session with panelists Eileen Hudon, Corrine Sanchez of Tewa Women United, and Alice Skenandore of Wise Women Gathering Place, all of whom are experienced in bridging tribal and nontribal advocacy.

Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy: Episode 4

Click here to view the webinar

Our fourth webinar in the Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Advocacy series focuses on the legal aspects of the challenges of Native American survivors in the legal/court context. Discussion on jurisdictional challenges, Federal Recognition and enrollment status, and Public Law 280 assists in informing non-tribal programs in ways to best assist their Native American clients. The National Tribal Trial College Court Advocacy Program is also highlighted to look at successful tribal court litigation by trained advocates.

Handouts:

Transcript

January 2021 Human Trafficking in Indian Country or AI/AN Communities: A Case Study and Resources

Click here to view webinar

In this webinar that took place during National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, American Indians Against Abuse, End Domestic Abuse WI, the WI Coalition Against Sexual Assault, the WI Office of Crime Victim Services, and the OVC Human Trafficking Capacity building Center/ National Center for Victims of Crime Tribal Resource Center offered this collaboration in which presenters outline human trafficking case studies involving survivors from American Indian/Alaska Native communities, discuss collaborative approaches, and share resources to assist survivors. Brief updates from Wisconsin are shared, as well.

Handouts:

Transcript

WI's Violence Against Women with Disabilities and Deaf Women Project

Collaborating for over a decade with Disability Rights Wisconsin, Deaf Unity, and the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault to support appropriate and effective services for people with disabilities and Deaf who are victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Selected Resources

Here are some resources to help advocates further their knowledge.

Diversity, Multiculturalism & Anti-Oppression

Created by the Access Committee of the Governor’s Council, this Anti-Oppression Manual for domestic abuse programs in Wisconsin was created to help explore ways in which an anti-oppression framework can be applied to our work on a daily basis to end domestic violence.

View/Download Manual

Report: Focus Groups Conducted with African American Female Victims of Domestic Violence in WI, 2014

Data show that African American women victims are over-represented as recipients of local domestic violence program services in WI, and in the rates of intimate partner homicide, both as victims and as perpetrators. During 2012 and 2013, End Abuse held a series of focus groups to amplify the voices of the women whose stories were behind the statistics. African American women survivors of domestic abuse shared their experiences, opinions, and ideas during these meetings.

We learned through our discussions with these women that they greatly appreciate the work of local domestic violence agencies. We also heard how profoundly their stories were shaped by the legacy of historical trauma, institutional racism, and discrimination, and for some women, chronic and acute poverty. Read the full report for more information about this critical issue.

View/Download Manual

Other pages in this section

Education
End Abuse provides a variety of educational opportunities to advocates, law enforcement, legislators, and community members to enable them to better serve survivors throughout WI.
Homicide Prevention
About Our Homicide Prevention Work Extensive research into domestic violence homicides has revealed certain indicators that are predictive of experiencing future lethal or near-lethal domestic violence. For the past several years, End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin has received funding from the...
Public Policy Advocacy
End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin mobilizes advocates, survivors, and concerned individuals to make policy changes that will support survivors and help end domestic violence.
Prevention
We envision promising prevention strategies that work with people and systems to challenge gender, race, and class stereotypes and oppressive norms while defining new ways to be a more positive, equitable, and just society.
Legal Services
Our legal team is a leader in educating advocates, attorneys, judges and others on the best responses to domestic abuse. In addition, we advocate for changes in laws and legal practices to improve the legal system for survivors.
Human Trafficking Awareness
End Abuse provides resources, training and technical assistance to programs serving domestic violence survivors, including survivors of human trafficking. Sex trafficking survivors face unique challenges to recovery and safety.
Engaging Youth
The children and youth program offers training, information, and resources for those working with youth. Also providing leadership opportunities for teens to develop skills they can use to educate their peers.
Economic Empowerment
Financial independence is key to domestic abuse survivors’ ability to live successful, violence-free lives. In partnership with local programs, we address economic needs and challenges so survivors can break free of violence.
Coordinated Community Response
For CCR and other DV/SA-focused multidisciplinary teams seeking to improve their community's response to domestic violence, sexual violence, and other forms of oppression.

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